Custom-made, 100% wool blankets

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Here at Little Brook Farm we maintain a handspinner flock of primarily Border Leicester sheep. The softest of our wool is sent to MacAusland’s Woolen Mill in Prince Edward Island, Canada and returns as blankets that are sold off the farm. For nearly a century, MacAusland’s has been producing quality blankets and yarns made of 100% virgin wool. Because of the high quality of the wool, the blankets are lighter than most wool blankets and are made to last a lifetime.

Blankets are available in lap size,  48″ x 60″, in a wide variety of colors.

Shipping: $12 USA, $20 Canada, $32 International (it will be added at checkout).

Custom wool blankets
Custom wool blankets
Custom-made lap-size blankets (48" x 60") woven from 100% virgin wool.
Price: $85.00
Color :
Destination :
Quantity:  

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February 20, 2010 is sheep shearing day at the farm. Visitors are welcome from 9:30 to Noon. You will have the opportunity to learn about how and why sheep are shorn. Handle some raw fleece and see some of the gorgeous blankets made from this fleece. Blankets will be available for purchase this day in Lap size and Queen size. There is no charge for visiting this day, but we will gratefully accept donations to the our Relay For Life team. We are raising money to support the work of the American Cancer Society. I do ask that you email me (see our Contact Us tab) to let me know if you plan to stop by so that I will have a rough head count. So come for a quick visit with the family or stay the whole time, it’s up to you.

The trouble with goats is.....

Animals can't read!

In the photos above, you’ll see our new Nigerian goat buck, Harold, doing what goats do. Standing IN the food to eat it. They can be so challenging to manage sometimes!

The other photo was taken the first weekend of December, (notice the green lawn!) at the Yuletide Festival at Storrowton Village at Eastern States Exposition. I couldn’t resist the picture of the sign with all the animals in the background!

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It’s been a busy winter so far. I actually wish it was a bit snowier though, despite all the extra work. The snow really helps to insulate the ground. It also makes it much easier for the horses to walk around. Everyone is tiptoeing carefully over the frozen ruts. Margo and Sherry, my two lowline cows are bred. Sherry is due in March and is enormous and Margo is due in May. We have a new Nigerian dwarf buck, Five Acres Harold and all of the older does are bred. I will be breeding the doelings starting the end of this month to coincide with the 2010 summer Farm Camp. Farm camp dates this year are July 12 – 16, and July 19 – 23. My sister Dana has been helping me to update my website and we should have camp information and registration forms available online by the end of this weekend. All of the ewes are bred and due to start lambing in March. The ewes will be sheared on saturday, February 20th by my good friend and shearer, Andy Rice of Hoggett Hill Farm in Halifax Vermont.

The rest of the fleeces have been sent off to become blankets. I am getting lap blankets this year, along with the queensize blankets I have gotten in the past. Can’t wait to see them! If they come back in time I hope to have them at the Food For Thought winter farmers market being held February 27th at the Turners Falls High School from 9 AM to noon. I will be sharing space at a booth there with Denise Leonard of Tanstaafl Farm, Greenfield. We will have grass fed lamb, sausage,  and kebobs along with recipes, blankets, fleeces, photographs and some hand made crafts available.

Tom and Travis spent a day dropping 8 trees behind the lambing barn to make way for the start of an addition to run the length of the old tobacco barn. This will house the border collies kennel, the lambing/kidding pen, a calving pen and some hay storage. Just never seem to have enough space! The original part of the barn will be finished off as a garage/workshop for Tom and Travis and their toys and projects.

I miss riding my great little cow horse, Rio. Her shoes are pulled and she is on winter break. I really got hooked on versatile working cow horse competitions with her this past year. She is really starting to “get it” with the cows. Just need to keep at it.

I enter 2010 feeling blessed that I am fortunate to spend time daily on a farm working with animals. I also feel blessed to have another job working with children as their school nurse. When I get to combine the two in my summer camp I feel like the luckiest person in the world. So look for more updates soon, stay warm and keep smiling.

Time to register for Farm Camp 2020

Sign up for Little Brook Farm Camp now – there are five weeks to choose from and as usual, it’s first-come-first-serve!

Easter Bunny sightings

There have been multiple Easter Bunny sightings here on the farm in the past few days. I have some seriously tolerant animals. Love the expressions on some of their faces!

Farm-raised turkeys

Order a home-grown, free-range bird, from 15 to 30 pounds, available in September-October.

Our coordinates

Little Brook Farm
334 Russell Street
Sunderland, MA 01375

413-665-3802
kristen@littlebrookfarm.com
littlebrookfarm.com

Camp dates 2020

February 17-21
April 20-24 CANCELLED
June 29-July 3 FULL
July 6-10 FULL

July 20-24 FULL

Come to camp!

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